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Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?

Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?

The Never-ending Daylight Saving Debate

The Never-ending Daylight Saving Debate

Check out this neat way to view Curiosity.

Check out this neat way to view Curiosity.

NASA - Curiosity's First Sample Drilling

Awesome! Way to go Curiosity and JPL. 

Silicon Valley . Bonus Video . American Experience . WGBH | PBS

Noyce was introduced to the transistor at Grinnell College.

climateadaptation:

This robot was used to monitor Hurricane Sandy. It runs on waves and sent wind speed and other weather data to satellites for researchers to use in real time.
joshbyard:

NOAA Successfully Deploys Wave Glider Robots In Live Test During Hurricane Sandy
NOAA deployed a Wave Glider named Mercury in the Atlantic earlier this week about 100 miles east of Tom’s River, N.J., just off the soon-to-be devastated Jersey Shore.
Mercury met Hurricane Sandy head on, streaming back realtime data on the storm as it came charging inland on Monday. Most notably, Mercury recorded winds as high as 70 knots (80 miles per hour) and a plunge in barometric pressure of over 54.3 millibars, troughing at 946 millibars just as Sandy was making landfall.
NOAA plans to eventually field entire fleets of these self-propelled, wave-powered instrument platforms along with faster moving counterparts (made from modified EMILY robots) that can actually keep pace with a storm (the slower-moving Wave Gliders are meant to position themselves in front of a storm as it blows over).
The data they collect will go a long way toward helping meteorologists improve their understanding of how different storms develop and the models they use to predict their paths and intensities—and hopefully save lives.
(via NOAA’s New Storm-Chasing Robot Survives Sandy And Reports Back | Popular Science)

climateadaptation:

This robot was used to monitor Hurricane Sandy. It runs on waves and sent wind speed and other weather data to satellites for researchers to use in real time.

joshbyard:

NOAA Successfully Deploys Wave Glider Robots In Live Test During Hurricane Sandy

NOAA deployed a Wave Glider named Mercury in the Atlantic earlier this week about 100 miles east of Tom’s River, N.J., just off the soon-to-be devastated Jersey Shore.

Mercury met Hurricane Sandy head on, streaming back realtime data on the storm as it came charging inland on Monday. Most notably, Mercury recorded winds as high as 70 knots (80 miles per hour) and a plunge in barometric pressure of over 54.3 millibars, troughing at 946 millibars just as Sandy was making landfall.

NOAA plans to eventually field entire fleets of these self-propelled, wave-powered instrument platforms along with faster moving counterparts (made from modified EMILY robots) that can actually keep pace with a storm (the slower-moving Wave Gliders are meant to position themselves in front of a storm as it blows over).

The data they collect will go a long way toward helping meteorologists improve their understanding of how different storms develop and the models they use to predict their paths and intensities—and hopefully save lives.

(via NOAA’s New Storm-Chasing Robot Survives Sandy And Reports Back | Popular Science)

(via davidgalestudios)

The Rush to Resilience: ‘We Don’t Have Decades Before the Next Sandy’
Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He’s also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts », theatlanticcities.com
In an era of dis­rup­tions so sig­nif­i­cant that we refer to them in a single-name short­hand (think: 9/11, Kat­ri­na, Fukushi­ma, Haiti, Sandy) what gives com­mu­ni­ties their abil­i­ty to bounce back? And what does it mean for the way we build…

The Rush to Resilience: ‘We Don’t Have Decades Before the Next Sandy’
Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He’s also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts », theatlanticcities.com

In an era of dis­rup­tions so sig­nif­i­cant that we refer to them in a single-name short­hand (think: 9/11, Kat­ri­na, Fukushi­ma, Haiti, Sandy) what gives com­mu­ni­ties their abil­i­ty to bounce back? And what does it mean for the way we build…

Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?

Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?

The Never-ending Daylight Saving Debate

The Never-ending Daylight Saving Debate

Check out this neat way to view Curiosity.

Check out this neat way to view Curiosity.

NASA - Curiosity's First Sample Drilling

Awesome! Way to go Curiosity and JPL. 

Silicon Valley . Bonus Video . American Experience . WGBH | PBS

Noyce was introduced to the transistor at Grinnell College.

climateadaptation:

This robot was used to monitor Hurricane Sandy. It runs on waves and sent wind speed and other weather data to satellites for researchers to use in real time.
joshbyard:

NOAA Successfully Deploys Wave Glider Robots In Live Test During Hurricane Sandy
NOAA deployed a Wave Glider named Mercury in the Atlantic earlier this week about 100 miles east of Tom’s River, N.J., just off the soon-to-be devastated Jersey Shore.
Mercury met Hurricane Sandy head on, streaming back realtime data on the storm as it came charging inland on Monday. Most notably, Mercury recorded winds as high as 70 knots (80 miles per hour) and a plunge in barometric pressure of over 54.3 millibars, troughing at 946 millibars just as Sandy was making landfall.
NOAA plans to eventually field entire fleets of these self-propelled, wave-powered instrument platforms along with faster moving counterparts (made from modified EMILY robots) that can actually keep pace with a storm (the slower-moving Wave Gliders are meant to position themselves in front of a storm as it blows over).
The data they collect will go a long way toward helping meteorologists improve their understanding of how different storms develop and the models they use to predict their paths and intensities—and hopefully save lives.
(via NOAA’s New Storm-Chasing Robot Survives Sandy And Reports Back | Popular Science)

climateadaptation:

This robot was used to monitor Hurricane Sandy. It runs on waves and sent wind speed and other weather data to satellites for researchers to use in real time.

joshbyard:

NOAA Successfully Deploys Wave Glider Robots In Live Test During Hurricane Sandy

NOAA deployed a Wave Glider named Mercury in the Atlantic earlier this week about 100 miles east of Tom’s River, N.J., just off the soon-to-be devastated Jersey Shore.

Mercury met Hurricane Sandy head on, streaming back realtime data on the storm as it came charging inland on Monday. Most notably, Mercury recorded winds as high as 70 knots (80 miles per hour) and a plunge in barometric pressure of over 54.3 millibars, troughing at 946 millibars just as Sandy was making landfall.

NOAA plans to eventually field entire fleets of these self-propelled, wave-powered instrument platforms along with faster moving counterparts (made from modified EMILY robots) that can actually keep pace with a storm (the slower-moving Wave Gliders are meant to position themselves in front of a storm as it blows over).

The data they collect will go a long way toward helping meteorologists improve their understanding of how different storms develop and the models they use to predict their paths and intensities—and hopefully save lives.

(via NOAA’s New Storm-Chasing Robot Survives Sandy And Reports Back | Popular Science)

(via davidgalestudios)

The Rush to Resilience: ‘We Don’t Have Decades Before the Next Sandy’
Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He’s also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts », theatlanticcities.com
In an era of dis­rup­tions so sig­nif­i­cant that we refer to them in a single-name short­hand (think: 9/11, Kat­ri­na, Fukushi­ma, Haiti, Sandy) what gives com­mu­ni­ties their abil­i­ty to bounce back? And what does it mean for the way we build…

The Rush to Resilience: ‘We Don’t Have Decades Before the Next Sandy’
Richard Florida is Co-Founder and Editor at Large at The Atlantic Cities. He’s also a Senior Editor at The Atlantic, Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, and Global Research Professor at New York University. He is a frequent speaker to communities, business and professional organizations, and founder of the Creative Class Group, whose current client list can be found here. All posts », theatlanticcities.com

In an era of dis­rup­tions so sig­nif­i­cant that we refer to them in a single-name short­hand (think: 9/11, Kat­ri­na, Fukushi­ma, Haiti, Sandy) what gives com­mu­ni­ties their abil­i­ty to bounce back? And what does it mean for the way we build…

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I'm a retired elementary science teacher who loves children, learning, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), Apple products, cycling, and the future. Have fun exploring these links with me.

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